Tree and Environment Sustainability Committee

The Tree and Environment Sustainability Committee (TESC) has re-formed as a merging of the Tree and Beautification Committee and the Committee on the Environment. The TESC is currently looking for members! To submit an application, please click here.

The vision of the committee is to establish partnerships with citizens, business owners, and other stakeholders to plan and implement measurable environmentally responsible and sustainable initiatives for Purcellville and our nation.

Members

HOAs Invited to Apply for Neighborwoods Grant Program (THIS INFORMATION IS DRAFT AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE)

The Town of Purcellville's Tree and Environment Sustainability Committee invites HOAs within Town limits to apply for funding to plant native trees! HOA applications that are accepted will be included in the Town's proposal to the Virginia Trees for Clean Water Program through the Virginia Department of Forestry. Apply online.

See the links below for more information.

Virginia Trees for Clean Water Grant - Increasing Diversity of Trees at the Suzanne R. Kane Nature Preserve, 2021
The Town of Purcellville received a Virginia Trees for Clean Water Grant issued by the Virginia Department of Forestry in 2021. Through the project, the town planted trees at the Suzanne R. Kane Nature Preserve to help maintain and improve the habitat, increase the number of native species in the area, and improve water quality so the preserve continues to provide the food, water, shelter, and shade necessary for native wildlife to thrive. The tree plantings were held in the spring and the fall, and completed with the help of volunteers. Watch a video of the plantings with a segment about the value of trees and tips for planting trees shared by Jim McGlone, Urban Forest Conservationist with the Virginia Department of Forestry. The Tree and Environment Sustainability Committee (TESC) also hosted a series of workshops about trees. Jordan Herring, Senior Area Forester with the Virginia Department of Forestry, led each of the three workshops. Additional efforts conducted through this project included flyers, signage, and online outreach through the Town’s website and social media.

Planting Trees? Be Sure to Mulch the Proper Way!
One of the educational flyers created for the 2021 Virginia Trees for Clean Water grant was about proper mulching for trees. Please see the information below to be sure you are mulching the right way!

Mulching TreesAnnual Hail to the Trail Planned for Sunday, October 23, 2022
The Town of Purcellville's Tree and Environment Sustainability Committee hosts the annual Hail to the Trail--Purcellville's Green Expo at the Chapman DeMary Trail. The 2021 event was held Sunday, October 17 from 1 to 4 p.m. Get more information on the Hail to the Trail - Purcellville Green Expo section of the Events and Activities page. Follow the Hail to the Trail Facebook page.

Virginia Trees for Clean Water: Restoring the Riparian Buffer at the Chapman DeMary Trail - 2018
South Fork Catoctin Creek at the Chapman DeMary TrailThe Town of Purcellville is pleased to announce that it is a recipient of the annual Virginia Trees for Clean Water grant issued by the Virginia Department of Forestry. The project is to restore the riparian buffer at the Chapman DeMary Trail, a 10-acre area that runs along the South Fork Catoctin Creek, part of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The Town of Purcellville holds the conservation easement for this privately-owned property. The native trees we planted included: black cherry, river birch, sycamore, and willow oak.

What is a Riparian Buffer?

According to the Virginia Department of Forestry website, a riparian buffer is a “streamside forest” with plants that line waterways to protect them from the impacts of surrounding land use. The functions of riparian buffers include:

  • Slowing flood waters and reducing the volume of water through root absorption.
  • Improving water quality by filtering runoff and promoting sediment deposition.
  • Allowing water storage in plant roots and providing pathways to groundwater layers.
  • Providing canopy cover which shades and cools the stream, improving habitat conditions for instream organisms (fish, salamanders, frogs, etc.). This shade also provides relief from extreme heat for terrestrial animals.
  • Providing habitat for a variety of birds and small mammals. These buffers also act as corridors to similar habitat, providing food, shelter and nesting sites.

Riparian areas also provide great opportunities for recreational activities such as fishing, hiking, bird-watching, picnicking and camping.


TESC collage for website